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BrainScope Grand Rounds Series- Publication Navigator

The BrainScope One system provides objective data that helps clinicians answer two key questions in mildly presenting head-injured patients:

1. Is it likely that there is a structural brain injury that would be visible on a CT scan?

2. Is there evidence of functional brain impairment that could indicate a concussion?

The video below highlights a decade worth of research and development of the BrainScope One device. This includes 24 investigator-initiated publications describing clinical usability, the standard of care comparisons, and the validation of the BrainScope One algorithms.

Grand Round Videos Presented By Leslie Prichep, Ph.D Chief Scientific Officer, BrainScope Company Inc. Adjunct Professor, Department of Psychiatry New York University School of Medicine

The following four videos are intended to educate healthcare professionals on the fundamental scientific and clinical basis of the BrainScope One device. They are not intended to be a substitute for device labeling. Please consult with BrainScope for detailed device labeling such as Indications for Use and Instruction / Directions for Use.

BrainScope Grand Rounds Series- Brain Function Index

The video below explains one of two of BrainScope One’s EEG-based brain injury assessment capabilities, the Brain Function Index. The BFI compares the patient’s brain electrical activity to that of a comparable non-injured population to objectively determine the likelihood, and severity, of brain function impairment.

Grand Round Videos Presented By Leslie Prichep, Ph.D Chief Scientific Officer, BrainScope Company Inc. Adjunct Professor, Department of Psychiatry New York University School of Medicine

BrainScope Grand Rounds Series- Structural Injury Classifier

The video below explains one of two of BrainScope One’s EEG-based brain injury assessment capabilities, the Structural Injury Classifier. The SIC provides clinicians with objective results that indicate the likelihood of a structural brain injury being present or visible on a CT Scan.

Grand Round Videos Presented By Leslie Prichep, Ph.D Chief Scientific Officer, BrainScope Company Inc. Adjunct Professor, Department of Psychiatry New York University School of Medicine

Hurt Your Head? How Do You Rule Out A Brain Bleed? Do You Have A Concussion?

BrainScope One is a new, accurate, cost-effective, radiation-free medical device, cleared by the FDA, that offers a full assessment of your head injury. This assessment tool collects objective information right from your brain! BrainScope One answers two important questions for your doctor: Is there a structural injury? Is there a functional abnormality? BrainScope One can assist your physician in making an objective decision on whether to send you to the ER, start treatment for a concussion, or send you home with a clean bill of health. While not a replacement to CT, BrainScope One assessment can be done at a fraction of the cost of a CT, it can be done at your neighborhood doctor’s office, urgent care setting or yes, even in the ER!

New Tool Takes On Early Detection Of Brain Injuries

Source: http://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2017/09/12/brainscope-brain-injury-tool/

By Alex DeMetrick

BALTIMORE (WJZ) — When it comes to looking for the first signs of concussion or other brain injuries, a new tool is available from a Maryland company — and it’s being backed by the NFL and the Department of Defense.

The device, called BrainScope, comes in two parts. It includes a disposable electrode headset, and a military-grade smartphone with specialized software.

The tool is designed to give an objective appraisal of possible brain injury as early as possible after an accident:

“So much of brain injury assessment is subjective, and so what we are adding is objectivity. You’re literally reading the brain electoral activity of the patient,” says Michael Singer, CEO of BrainScope.

“Close your eyes, relax and keep your feet flat on the floor.”

The software compares activities of an uninjured brain, like relaxing, with the readings of someone who suffered a concussion.

It also compares cognitive functions with tests taken by the patient, which could lead to a CT scan.

“We run multiple tests and that aggregation is what is then used by the clinicians for them to make a diagnosis,” says Singer.

Supporters of Bethesda-based BrainScope include the military, with the defense department providing funding, as well as the NFL, where brain injuries to players have gone from locker room secret to full-blown headlines:

“There’s just no denying a lot of guys out there like me dealing with the stage of brain injury,” says former NFL player Mitch White.

The portability of BrainScope means versatility with FDA approval.

“It’s meant to be anywhere a head injury might occur, so our markets are places like urgent care centers, emergency room departments in hospitals, the military, universities,” says Singer.

 

NFL Shows off Technologies to prevent concussions at Moscone Center

As part of the lead up to Super Bowl 50 the National Football League is showing off technologies it is funding to help prevent concussions among players.

By Eric Thomas

Thursday, February 04, 2016 11:47PM

SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) --

As part of the lead up to Super Bowl 50 the National Football League is showing off technologies it is funding to help prevent concussions among players.

The show was timely. A week after the NFL released numbers showing an almost 60 percent increase in reported concussions last season, they brought in medical experts to talk about it

"I believe very strongly that the NFL has an unmatched opportunity and platform to affect change when it comes to player health," said Betsy Nabel, the NFL's chief medical advisor.

The league showed off companies funded by something called the Head Health Initiative. These firms have used grants to come up with projects to try and protect players from head injury, like a helmet that uses special shock absorbing structure to reduce brain-rattling force.

"When you hit it gives a little bit, like a car bumper and redistributes the force," said Samuel Brown, a neurologist.

One strange looking invention tries to diagnose concussions by examining brain waves.

"We look at particular patterns within the brain and then use a sophisticated algorithm to decipher those patterns," said Michael Singer, the CEO of Brainscope.

The NFL has fought a public relations battle, with players filing suit saying they weren't told about the dangers. And even a big screen movie, "Concussion," about the doctor who first recognized concussions could lead to a deadly condition called CTE.

Retired players worry about what will happen to them.

"As a linebacker if you don't know that you're hitting people with your head and there could be a problem, I mean you're kind of crazy if you don't realize that," said Chris Draft, former NFL linebacker.

Even if these products prove effective there's still one thing scientists will have to deal with, the fact that players get bigger and stronger every year.